10 Comments
Nov 1, 2023Liked by Thomas Reilly

OK, no evidence the authors took into account the mixed-effect model used to test for differences between groups over time in their power calculations, but can't you/someone run the more complex and appropriate power calculations to check how far from reasonable the sample size actually is considering the statistical model used?

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Nov 16, 2023Liked by Thomas Reilly

One issue worth noting:

ECT is ALSO done under anesthesia.

How do we know that ECT's benefits aren't from anesthesia?

ECT seemed to get a lot better when they started anesthetizing people for the procedure, which is exactly what you'd expect if anesthesia was the active thing here.

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Nice discussion!

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Nov 1, 2023Liked by Thomas Reilly

Fantastic article Thomas, we have also been debating this one in our circles and your piece sums up a lot of our thoughts but you have made them explicit. Thank you!

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The study amply proves the power of expectancy. If people thought they got ketamine (but actually received placebo) they improved 42%. But, if they thought they got placebo, (but actually got ketamine), they improved 25%. There was no difference between placebo and ketamine efficacy in the people who got placebo. (Graph B). So, people's beliefs had a profound effect on their improvement, and the power of belief over-rode the impact of the chemical that was put in their bodies.

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